Lou the transphobe? Please!

‘Walk on the Wild Side’ Lou Reed’s most famous song, hit the headlines recently courtesy of the University of Guelph Central Student Association in Canada.  Originally recorded for his bestselling classic album Transformer produced by David Bowie and Mick Ronson (formerly a Spider from Mars to Bowie’s Ziggy Stardust), it somehow slipped a line about ‘giving head’ past the censors in 1972. This time around, 45 years later, the would-be censors published an apology for the song and its ‘transphobic lyrics’ finding its way onto a playlist at one of its events.

Apparently ‘the person making the list did not know or understand the lyrics’. They weren’t the only one. The rush to seek offence – a regrettable feature of contemporary life, both on campus and in the field of identity politics – is such that all is swept before it, even a song written by somebody who was no stranger to transgressing the norms of his day. ‘Bi? The fucker’s quad!’ one roadie was reputed to have anwered when quizzed about Reed’s sexuality. While David Bowie with that album had brought him renewed fame, it was Reed and the Velvet Underground, and the mifits that populated Andy Warhol’s Factory, that were the original gender-benders.

Candy Says, from the Velvets’ third album and also written by Reed, is a sad and tender song about Warhol muse and trailblazing transsexual drag-queen Candy Darling, who died tragically at the age of 29.  Reed even dedicated his sometimes overlooked gem of an album Coney Island Baby to his drag-queen lover Rachel. He was transgressive to the end, with his critically panned project with Metallica, Lulu, based on a couple of obscure German plays, with sexually-shocking lyrics sung by a 60-something Reed from the perspective of a female stripper-cum-prostitute.

But lets go back to the song in question. According to Hal Willner, who produced Lulu and Reed’s other late albums: ‘This song was how the world first heard about these people. It’s a song about love.’ Not least Lou’s love for the New York misfits he knew and wrote about. A world away from the curiously conformist one inhabited by today’s students and activists. What’s good about this bizarre controversy is that Lou Reed is back in the news. Dying just a couple of years before Bowie, I’m not sure enough people really know what a genius he was. And so influential too. Bowie wouldn’t have been Bowie without him.

He’d no doubt have dispatched his critics with a monotone-delivered but deadly one-liner if he was still around. The least today’s generation can do is take Lou’s advice. Take a walk on the wild side.

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